thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 
thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 

thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpiece: Complete original painted art by Arthur Suydam for “Mudwogs” in Echo of Futurepast #4, published by Continuity Publishing Inc., February 1985. The published story has text and dialogue, but I personally prefer this version. 

(via johntdraws)

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch

Recreates 13 paintings by Edward Hopper

felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper
felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch
Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper

felineillusion:

Shirley: Visions of Reality / 2013 / dir. Gustav Deutsch

Inspired by the art of American painter Edward Hopper

(via christianizcool)

wardkimball:

The mad genius of the animation world meets the mad genius of the art world: Ward Kimball + Salvador Dali

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

sachinteng:

30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your Favorite Culture
I’m Buddhist and I’ve always loved the imagery even before I was. The wrathful deities from Tibetan and Mahayana art always fascinated me as a kid. They were like transformations the gods took on in battle. Like a monster magical girl I guess. His is name is Mahakala. Power Prism Make Up.

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

sachinteng:

30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your Favorite Culture

I’m Buddhist and I’ve always loved the imagery even before I was. The wrathful deities from Tibetan and Mahayana art always fascinated me as a kid. They were like transformations the gods took on in battle. Like a monster magical girl I guess. His is name is Mahakala. Power Prism Make Up.

image

mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.
mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.

mercurialblonde:

tannhausergatorade:

Gene Day, my favorite artist on The Hands of Shang Chi, Master of Kung Fu

Good grief.  Just wow.

(via mendelpalace)

colourthysoul:

Umberto Moggioli - L’Americanina (The Little American Girl) (1917)

(via caravaggista)

myjetpack:

My book of cartoons ‘You’re All Just Jealous of my Jetpack’ is available now:
US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1770461043
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1770461043
Other stockists and info at www.tomgauld.com

mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping.  mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.
But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 
You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 
I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 
Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping. 

mendelpalace:

I was up late last night and when I was digging around the archive on here I started thinking about Jack Kirby, specifically Kirby and horror comics. Kirby never really gets talked about much in regard to horror, it didn’t seem to be his bag usually. I mean he did Black Magic in the 50s, plus The Demon and the Spirit World one-off and a few other things, but horror is pretty far down on the list of things he’s known for. As cynical and world-weary as Kirby could be at times, there’s an optimism in him that probably is antithetical to doing full-on horror comics.

But looking at Kirby pages on their own I sometimes get this sense of an uptapped vein of horror in the King, particularly from his 70s stuff when his style got wilder and weirder. Amorphous terrors, distorted forms. Faces frozen in anguish or melting into nothing. Abstract, crackling energy. The way he morphs the human form at times seem like it could descend into straight-up body horror if pushed even the slightest. Even in his more optimistic comics there’s often something eerie, uncanny creeping in the corners. 

You can maybe see a bit of the Kirby-as-horror in Mike Mignola’s comics I think, though of course he’s developed a style all his own. 

I don’t know: late last night, tired, In my head I imagine there’s a world of comics by Kirby that dives even deeper into this imagery and that gut level feeling I get looking at some of his stuff. Just kinda extrapolating whole comics from certain imagery. If I had the time and the talent I’d maybe take a crack at putting pencil to paper and try to capture that feeling. 

Sorry if this isn’t particularly compelling or coherent, I just needed to do a brain dumping. 

mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  
mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  
mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  
mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  
mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  

mendelpalace:

Various comparisons between the works of Jack Kirby and various artists (Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Hoch and Lyubov Popova. These comparison pictures and more come from the Abstract Comics blog, so check it out as well.  

(via mendelpalace)